Calluses

Callus is thickening of the skin usually in response to pressure. Callus usually forms on the ball of the foot and the heel. It may, however, form over any bony prominence. Calluses may develop from shearing force on the bottom of the feet or sometimes they have a deep seated “core”, known as a nucleation. This type of callus can be exquisitely painful to pressure and needs to be treated properly by a professional.

Symptoms

  • A hard growth usually on the ball of the foot
  • Pain on weight bearing, relieved by rest
  • Increased discomfort in thin soled and high heeled shoes
  • More common in women than men

Causes

  • High heeled shoes
  • Abnormalities of gait
  • Flat feet and High arched feet
  • Excessively long metatarsal bone
  • Obesity
  • Bony prominence
  • Loss of fat pad on the underside of the foot

Treatment

  • Avoid high heeled shoes
  • Buy shoes with a good arch and shock absorbing rubber sole
  • Keep skin moist and supple with regular application of a moisturizer
  • Apply non-medicated pads around the callus to relieve pressure
  • Apply moleskin over areas that tend to callus
  • Carefully debride the callus and any deep seated core it may have.
  • Apply various pads to relieve pressure
  • Orthotics to correct functional problems
  • Surgically realign metatarsals,or remove bony prominences

IMPORTANT:
Calluses can become very painful and at times have stopped many people from functioning properly. However they can be limb threatening in diabetic patients with lack of sensation as they can develop into ulcers extending to the bone with very serious consequences.


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